Managing The UAV Madness: 5 Keys To Success

Trimble Gatewing

Agriculture has a bright future and the word is out. In July, I had the privilege of speaking at the InfoAg Conference about Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or UAVs.

Seven years ago, I was just learning about UAVs and their potential and the concept was in its infancy. So I was amazed at how many people packed the room for this year’s breakout session and UAV panel. There was seating for over 300 people, and every one was filled. Not only that, but there were people two- and three-deep in standing in back and along the side of the room.

But why do I think agriculture and UAVs have a bright future? Because of the people in attendance. There were people there outside of agriculture looking at our industry — people from the Department of Defense, the Air Force, global consulting companies and Microsoft, to name a few. In addition, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) had a booth. Agriculture looks real sexy to those outside of our immediate circle.

Attracting A Business Crowd

With this type of success and exposure to our industry come people who are used to the business world, with professional ranks, college degrees and corporate affiliations that make people do a double take. This is great for agriculture because outside money is looking to invest. However, agriculture has seen a similar scenario before and not too many years ago.

When starting in precision ag and UAVs I had to learn the hard way. I didn’t have a good support system for the precision ag equipment, and being the first in anything brings one heck of a learning curve. During my travels as an Eisenhower Fellow, my study topic was precision agriculture, remote sensing and UAVs, and involved world travel. Speaking at different venues around the U.S. and the world has provided me some tremendous insight into what is taking place and needs to happen in order for UAVs to be successful in ag.

Here are my top five bits of advice for folks looking to stake a UAV claim:

1. Proceed with caution. I will start with a word of caution to those outside of ag that believe there is money to be made. There is, but not at the expense of the customer. I saw that path in the early stages of UAVs and broke away from the company I was trying to work with because money is not everything. In ag, it’s about building a relationship.

Look at the word — Agri-Culture. It is a culture. It is a way of life for most people involved, especially the farmer. When it comes to UAVs, at this point in time you are being “invited into their home for a visit,” so to speak. How you handle it from here is up to you.

It was great to see six different UAV vendors with booths at InfoAg, and the interest farmers had in those products. However, when talking with most of the vendors and looking at the products, I fear they will frustrate the end-user during this crucial “courting” stage, potentially giving UAVs a bad name.

There’s a corollary to the earlier stages of precision ag — some salespeople sold products to generate cash flow without looking at it as a relationship. This is one of the reasons precision ag didn’t take off like it should have.
UAVs have gained momentum in the last couple of years in the U.S. and globally. The products, knowledge of the salespeople and product support has also increased. There is a direct correlation between the approach taken by the company selling something and the trust a farmer has at all of the levels.

There is a saying in ag: “In order to work cows quickly, you must go slow.” In other words, UAV companies: Please do your homework and treat farmers like friends, not customers.

2. Partner with agriculture. In order for UAVs to be successful, a UAV company needs to partner with a person or company with in-depth knowledge of on-the-ground ag and UAVs. As I stated before, agriculture is a unique business sector with many different facets. What might work on one crop, segment, or area might not work in another. This partnership can save many hours, days and years of research.

3. Use the farmer’s knowledge. Some of the most intelligent and savvy business people on the planet are farmers. When you look at how a farmer is able to make a profit when they pay the freight for both their inputs and their outputs, the business acumen they have to possess is amazing.

To go along with that, most have been farming the same pieces of land for 20, 40 or more years. That is too much knowledge to just disregard. They have a tremendous understanding and feel for their crops, land, nutrient management, pest management, etc. that can be used to make UAVs become successful.

Just because you built it doesn’t necessarily mean that they will come. During my UAV journey, I clearly saw the potential uses and information that they could provide. I would get excited and the wheels would start turning until I was asked to “quantify” my thoughts. Most farmers, including myself, are not geared that way. If there is a problem, we find the solution, and then do it.

4. Create products farmers want, not what you think they need. While this seems very simple and is broken all the time in the business world, agriculture is different. You have already piqued a farmer’s interest by having a UAV. Now you need to create the products that they need, from airframes to autopilots, to software and everything in between. Listen to the farmer. While there will be many different opinions, after a bit you will find out what they want.

Use that knowledge to create the best products that will withstand abuse and that farmers will share with their neighbors. It’s all about word of mouth. If a neighbor is doing it and being successful (the early adapter) then others will follow.

Price will also be a factor in your product. If a farmer has $30,000, he knows what a tractor, combine or sprayer will do. This newfangled toy is a novelty. You have to show him how it can benefit his pocketbook, not just yours.

5. Use the power and voice of farmers to create pressure for FAA rules that are timely and make sense. This is the biggest roadblock keeping UAVs out of ag. Until this gets resolved, the fledgling commercial UAV industry is going nowhere.

The potential benefits this new technology brings to not only agriculture but society is tremendous. However, without ag at the table stating what they need and want as far as regulations, it will still flounder.

Agriculture has a great seasoned voice in the halls of Congress and Legislatures. Use that voice and listen to their concerns for privacy while they have a need for information on their farm. It can be a difficult balancing act, but it can be done.

AUVSI needs to team with American Farm Bureau Federation, the American Soybean Association, the National Corn Growers Association, and the list goes on.

When we look at the economic impact agriculture has on most states, it has been the difference between cutting programs and/or raising taxes. Ag still has a strong voice, but if the UAV industry were to team with them now, many different sectors and votes are represented.

These are some exciting times in ag and I am happy to be in the middle of it. I believe that the potential UAVs have in agriculture is off the charts. We are in the information age and the better and timelier information a farmer has, the better the decisions are that he makes.

While there are more technical things that I could make a UAV list on, I believe at this stage in the game we need to create the industry first.

Leave a Reply

7 comments on “Managing The UAV Madness: 5 Keys To Success

  1. Good comments Robert. I agree that there is a great opportunity for UAVs in agriculture, and it is good to see the interest from outside of ag. But we need to develop the right partnerships among the UAV industry, farmers, Certified Crop Advisers, university staff, and others to make this technology fit into the mainstream of crop production and avoid some of the pitfalls that you mentioned that delayed adoption of other precision ag technologies. Careful cooperation with FAA and other regulatory agencies will also be very important in getting this technology properly in place. THanks for sharing your ideas here—and at the InfoAg Conference!

  2. Good comments Robert. I agree that there is a great opportunity for UAVs in agriculture, and it is good to see the interest from outside of ag. But we need to develop the right partnerships among the UAV industry, farmers, Certified Crop Advisers, university staff, and others to make this technology fit into the mainstream of crop production and avoid some of the pitfalls that you mentioned that delayed adoption of other precision ag technologies. Careful cooperation with FAA and other regulatory agencies will also be very important in getting this technology properly in place. THanks for sharing your ideas here—and at the InfoAg Conference!

  3. Blair's article on UAV's and the approach to HELPING the agricultural industry is spot on! I have witnessed far too many UAV' manufactures who build systems for defense, law enforcement or surveying recognize the potential in agriculture recently announce, "we have an ag UAV system too!" However they are expensive, difficult to operate, not durable and can not be flown in winds of 20 – 30 mph winds. Most importantly as Blair points out, many of these new entries into the Ag UAV industry approaches the ag customers as any other corporate buyer without regards to a personal relationship. Most importantly, they forget to justify how the UAV can benefit the user or provide him with a reasonable payback. While other manufactures of UAV's have been promoting their systems at trade shows like the InfoAg Conference about Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or UAVs, we at AgEagle have been working with farmers in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri and Illinois refining the functionality for ag use. Precision agricultural professionals are not enamored with the technology to acquire aerial images. They don't care if the images are captured with an airplane, kite or balloon. They simply want data that can help them increase yields or decrease input costs. For all the above reasons is why AgEagle is designed and built from the ground up for agricultural use. The AgEagle flying wing has flown missions in winds of 30 mph, it launches automatically, flies missions autonomously and even lands itself. Software to stitch the photos into one big mosaic and even software to enhance NDVI colors along with an NDVI camera is included. Also AgEagle will soon introduce a tool to create shape files or prescription maps of fields based on NDVI deviation in the field. I appreciate what Blair has stated in the article and hope that anyone considering a UAV (drone) for agricultural use read and heed his suggestions. Good stuff! Bret C

  4. Blair's article on UAV's and the approach to HELPING the agricultural industry is spot on! I have witnessed far too many UAV' manufactures who build systems for defense, law enforcement or surveying recognize the potential in agriculture recently announce, "we have an ag UAV system too!" However they are expensive, difficult to operate, not durable and can not be flown in winds of 20 – 30 mph winds. Most importantly as Blair points out, many of these new entries into the Ag UAV industry approaches the ag customers as any other corporate buyer without regards to a personal relationship. Most importantly, they forget to justify how the UAV can benefit the user or provide him with a reasonable payback. While other manufactures of UAV's have been promoting their systems at trade shows like the InfoAg Conference about Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or UAVs, we at AgEagle have been working with farmers in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri and Illinois refining the functionality for ag use. Precision agricultural professionals are not enamored with the technology to acquire aerial images. They don't care if the images are captured with an airplane, kite or balloon. They simply want data that can help them increase yields or decrease input costs. For all the above reasons is why AgEagle is designed and built from the ground up for agricultural use. The AgEagle flying wing has flown missions in winds of 30 mph, it launches automatically, flies missions autonomously and even lands itself. Software to stitch the photos into one big mosaic and even software to enhance NDVI colors along with an NDVI camera is included. Also AgEagle will soon introduce a tool to create shape files or prescription maps of fields based on NDVI deviation in the field. I appreciate what Blair has stated in the article and hope that anyone considering a UAV (drone) for agricultural use read and heed his suggestions. Good stuff! Bret C

  5. Robert, Future UAV's offer a more economical platform for airborne remote sensing and therefore timely and repetitive crop monitoring. I applaud your list of cautions and would like to add a reminder of the obvious, the UAV is only a vehicle when the important thing is proper collection of data and appropriate information derived from the data. Your good understanding of producers and grassroots agriculture in general is in short supply. The adoption path for UAV's in agriculture is all to predictable I fear and you touched on that. Wish it wasn't so. But there are a lot of tech savvy agriculturists who do understand what should be done, so I gain hope the technology will grow having integrity and producer's best interest…learning from past mistakes in precision technologies.

  6. Robert, Future UAV's offer a more economical platform for airborne remote sensing and therefore timely and repetitive crop monitoring. I applaud your list of cautions and would like to add a reminder of the obvious, the UAV is only a vehicle when the important thing is proper collection of data and appropriate information derived from the data. Your good understanding of producers and grassroots agriculture in general is in short supply. The adoption path for UAV's in agriculture is all to predictable I fear and you touched on that. Wish it wasn't so. But there are a lot of tech savvy agriculturists who do understand what should be done, so I gain hope the technology will grow having integrity and producer's best interest…learning from past mistakes in precision technologies.

Drones Stories
Wingtra
DronesOpinion: Combining Two Pluses with the WingtraOne UAV
September 13, 2018
For the every-day consumer interested in UAVs, there is an ocean of products from which to choose. This includes the Read More
DronessenseFly Launches eBee X Drone, Breaks Through 1,000 acre Coverage Ceiling
September 5, 2018
senseFly today reportedly sets a new standard in mapping tools with the launch of the eBee X. Launched with the Read More
group-photo
DronesPrecision Agriculture Takes Flight at North Carolina State
July 13, 2018
Take a walk into the Suggs Laboratory for Precision Agriculture and Machine Systems and it’s hard not to be impressed, Read More
Skeketee-IC-Weeder
DronesAutomated Weeders Have Arrived in Vegetable Fields
July 12, 2018
The vegetable production areas of the Central Coast of California have lifted vegetable cultivation to a high art, writes Richard Read More
Trending Articles
Soil-Hand
Data ManagementAre You Using Your Soil to Its Full Potential?
September 14, 2018
Harvest is progressing across most parts of the U.S. and those growers who aren’t already harvesting are gearing up to Read More
Grower-Retailer
Imagery/SensingAgtech: 10 Things I Hate About You!
September 4, 2018
Before you get bent out of shape from the title, remember if you’ve read my articles before you know I Read More
Kansas State University
Industry NewsKansas State University, Topcon Form Precision Ag Research Partnership
August 30, 2018
Kansas State University and Topcon Agriculture are collaborating to develop tools and systems to advance precision agriculture and support farmers. Read More
Blockchain building block graphic
Specialty CropsIs Blockchain the Future of Food Safety?
August 24, 2018
When the Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) was standardized in 1982, permitting the worldwide proliferation of interconnected networks and eventually the Read More
WinField’s Joel Wipperfurth On Empowering Data-Driven Decisions
InfoAg ConferenceOne on One with Joel Wipperfurth, Winfield United
August 15, 2018
Winfield United's Joel Wipperfurth discusses ag technology trends and topics during last month’s InfoAg Conference. Read More
Geosys
Industry NewsUrtheCast to Acquire Geosys from Land O’Lakes in $20 Million Deal
August 15, 2018
UrtheCast Corp. and Land O’Lakes, Inc. today announced they have entered a binding term sheet for the purchase of Geosys Read More
Latest News
Business ManagementIvy Tech, Farmers Partner to Help Precision Ag Educatio…
September 20, 2018
Harvest time has taken on a new meaning for some Wabash Valley farmers, and Bobbi Hunt-Kincaid hopes her family’s first Read More
Sensors
Sensors/IoTThe Answer to Agriculture’s Daunting Challenges – Soil …
September 20, 2018
According to the United Nations, 9.6 billion people will live on planet Earth by 2050. Feeding these mouths will require Read More
Google-Earth-Map-featured-image
Data ManagementRainfall Revisited: Accurate Observations and Beyond
September 18, 2018
As a provider of weather analysis and forecast services to the agricultural industry, one of the most common questions I Read More
PenelopeNagel
Business ManagementWhy Is Funding a Challenge for Women-Led Agtech Compani…
September 17, 2018
When it comes to women-led agtech companies the funding discussion never seems to cease. In June after the The New Read More
Mobile Phone in field
Decision Support SoftwareWhy Are 570 Million Farmers Not Yet Using Agricultural …
September 17, 2018
Until recently, using agricultural apps and software was a rare practice among growers. This is now changing. The mass adoption Read More
Soil-Hand
Data ManagementAre You Using Your Soil to Its Full Potential?
September 14, 2018
Harvest is progressing across most parts of the U.S. and those growers who aren’t already harvesting are gearing up to Read More
Grower Services & SolutionsDeere-Granular Collaboration Produces New Profit Maps T…
September 14, 2018
The newest development from the ongoing John Deere-Granular product development and marketing collaboration is Profit Maps, now available to farmers Read More
Wingtra
DronesOpinion: Combining Two Pluses with the WingtraOne UAV
September 13, 2018
For the every-day consumer interested in UAVs, there is an ocean of products from which to choose. This includes the Read More
Farmer-tablet
AsiaShould Agri-Input Manufacturers Outsource E-Commerce to…
September 12, 2018
Editor’s note: Venky Ramachandran is a contributing writer for PrecisionAg.com’s sister site, AgriBusinessGlobal.com. This article was originally published on LinkedIn. Now, Read More
ICON-Link-Licensing_featured-image
Industry NewsValley Irrigation Adds Remote Irrigation Management Opt…
September 11, 2018
Valley Irrigation, an industry leader in smart irrigation solutions, has announced enhancements to its remote management technologies. Multi-Year Licensing In Read More
Reflex-Connect-Agri-Inject-featured-image
Variable Rate ApplicationVariable Rate Fertigation System Expands with Mobile Co…
September 10, 2018
Building on the success of its Reflex Variable Rate Fertigation system, Agri-Inject has taken fluid injection to the next level Read More
Industry NewsTeralytic Earns Ag Data Transparent Certification
September 10, 2018
Soil analytics company Teralytic has completed the Ag Data Transparent certification, affirming that their data use is private, secure, and Read More
Business ManagementTop 20 Two-Year Colleges for Precision Agriculture
September 10, 2018
Earlier this year, I compiled a list of the 25 best colleges for precision agriculture. It was quite the process. Read More
Industry NewsRaven, Topcon Announce Slingshot API Agreement
September 6, 2018
Raven Industries and Topcon Agriculture announced today a licensing agreement for Topcon Agriculture’s use of the Slingshot Application Programming Interface Read More
Tablet Grower
Data ManagementThe Power of Predictive Analytics in Agriculture
September 5, 2018
Years ago if we would have been told computers, data, and technology would be scattered around every farm there may Read More
DronessenseFly Launches eBee X Drone, Breaks Through 1,000 ac…
September 5, 2018
senseFly today reportedly sets a new standard in mapping tools with the launch of the eBee X. Launched with the Read More
AmericasOn The Scene: 2018 Farm Progress Show Wrap Up
September 5, 2018
Former Monsanto President (now Bayer CropScience Chief Operating Office) Brett Begemann’s opening salvo during his first appearance at a Farm Read More
EventsAg Experts Discuss Big Data Challenges in Agriculture
September 5, 2018
Agricultural experts at a Houston conference praised the advancements in unmanned aerial vehicles, sensors, and data-collecting technology used in precision Read More